Important does not mean interesting. Quite the opposite.

Inversely proportionated.

The more Important a news topic is for daily life, the less interesting it is to follow.

Weather, Crime and traffic are top important for daily life but definitely not topics to follow.

Gov and Politics #1 in not important for daily life and a third of interest to follow vs Restaurants, Clubs and Bars.

This is to be related to:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

and this, to save a declining situation:

“Local leads to trust”

taken seriously by Google, Facebook, Knight Foundation, Automatic…

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

 

Google to the local media rescue.

Google to the local media rescue.

As a follow up to our post originally posted 1/17, updated 2/19, here’s the march update, in a separate post as we’re covering here a Google initiative.

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

The Local Experiment Project.

[this post is inspired by an Axios post] “Google is launching the Local Experiments Project, an effort to fund dozens of new local news websites around the country and eventually around the world.

Financially supported. Editorially independent.

The tech giant says it will have no editorial control over the sites, which will be built by partners it selects with local news expertise.”

The Compass Experiment.

Is a partnership between Google and McClatchy to launch three new, digital-only local news operations on multiple platforms.

  • McClatchy will maintain sole editorial control and ownership of the sites and Google will have no input or involvement in any editorial efforts or decision making.
  • Google says the investments will be significant. “We will be spending many millions of dollars on this overall,” says Richard Gingras, Google’s VP of news.
  • McClatchy will choose 3 cities that are less than a half million people for the site launches. It hasn’t announced any hiring plans, but people familiar with the efforts say there will eventually be people on the ground in those cities.
  • Smaller cities will be the focus. McClatchy CEO Craig Forman says it’s targeting cities with less than a half million people because that’s where local news decay is worst. Gingras says those cities are important because people there have a strong sense of community, which can harder to tap into at the metro and national levels.

Between the lines: McClatchy will be the first of many “experiments” within the Local Experiment Project. The goal is to use the lessons from McClatchy’s efforts, and others in the future, to create a network of shared insights that can be leveraged by everyone in the local news business.

Next? The World!

What’s next: If successful, Google may expand its tools and services to enable others to launch similar sites in other places in the U.S. and around the world. Gingras points to examples of news sites in Canada, France and the U.S. as examples of local news businesses that can thrive with the right strategies and investments.

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Brands buy Media Brands.

Reaching out to customers. Potential and existing.

There was advertising.
There was sponsoring.
There also was Commercial Brands creating their own media brand, such as (sources: Axios):

Now, Brands buy Media Brands

Robinhood, a trading app (raised $110M in 2017), instead of creating its own brand like seen above, is buying one: MarketSnacks , a newsletter and podcast media brand focused on financial trading. An interesting evolution for the media industry. Imagine, Nissan buying Car and Driver? Yes, I hear you. Jeff Bezos owns the Washington Post, but it’s not Amazon and WaPo is not a straight coverage for Amazon either.

All about transparency.

As written, trust in Media will come back with Privacy and Transparency. As long as you are aware of who is behind a Media, (or political orientation, or depth of expertise…) the content will be educational and useful as long as you accept the profile of the media.

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

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Facebook’s news tab is a great idea IF users can curate their sources.

Screenshot from Facebook

The new News tab idea…

If you have an hour, this video/conversation is definitely worth it. Matthias Döpfner, Axel Springer’s CEO, was blunt and asked the right questions, from a journalist, online and print publisher, EU guy.

… if the user can define her/his trust criteria.

My fav part is well explained in this Recode article and in particular, the News tab idea is great but, to me and unsurprisingly, only if the FB user can do its own curation of publishers meeting his/her trust values.

“And as Zuckerberg notes in his comments, he isn’t sure whether Facebook should be curating a mix of news for users or letting them pick most of what they want to see.

Trust is personal. No-one can tell you what you trust.

As we wrote:

While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

This is the foundation of TrustedOut.

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Online lie detector or Machine learning how to lie.

Online lie detector or Machine learning how to lie.

Interesting article in Wired “RESEARCHERS BUILT AN ‘ONLINE LIE DETECTOR.’ HONESTLY, THAT COULD BE A PROBLEM”

Yes, it’s a first attempt. Yes, it should be taken very cautiously.
But yes, it has merit.

Typing and writing.

The way you type and the words you use show a level of lie or truth, from your standpoint. While recording and analyzing the typing part sounds more like a lie detection test, the word used are, in fact, much more accurate.

TrustedOut uses a similar method.

As mentioned, TrustedOut uses extensively machine learning. In this previous post, we explained how machine learning is the basis of our classification. For taxonomy or how to spot how a media is perceived on the internet.

The How and What: Mixing attitude and expertise.

Now, imagine you mix an attitude, such as lying or being blunt, or positive, or sarcastic and a taxonomy classification, and you mix two or more classifications based on machine learning. And you get the how and what…

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Distrust in Media driven by distrust in government.

According to VisionCritical: “trust [in Media] among the informed public in the U.S. plunged 23 points to 45, making it the lowest of the 28 countries surveyed. The collapse of trust is driven by a staggering lack of faith in government. This fell 14 points to 33 percent among the general population, and 30 points to 33 percent among the informed public. [Numbers are for the USA]”

63% can’t recognize journalism from rumors.

“The 2018 Trust Barometer found 63 percent of respondents don’t know how to tell good journalism from rumor, or whether a respected media organization had produced a piece of news. But the public doesn’t rely solely on news media organizations to stay informed. We also use search engines and social media. The irony is that these platforms—once hailed as the future of media—are hurting too. The rising distrust of traditional media comes at a time when social media giants such as Facebook are facing intense scrutiny about their role in spreading disinformation. The Huffington Post recently announced it would no longer rely on unpaid bloggers.

Journalism for the win!

It’s all about brand values.

We recently published in “Why customer trust is more vital to [media] brand survival than it’s ever been” :

Gaining trust: demonstrate [media] brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures.

“Board and staff members need to adhere to these ethical standards as, in effect, they are the brand and only they can elicit consumer trust,” he [Director of brand agency Hulsbosch, Jaid Hulsbosch] says.

To do this, a corporation and its brand needs to be determined to demonstrate brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures”

Profiling Media Brands to secure trust in analytics and brand safety.

Brand values for any business, including Media, are the foundation of trust for customers, readers. Understanding them is the solution to secure trust in analytics support for strategic decision making and totally secure advertiser’s brand within a campaign.

Questions? Shoot!

 

TrustedOut + Digimind = Trust in your Sources means Trust in your Analytics.

Register to the event

Mark your agenda! 04.11.19.900.

April 11th, 9-11:30am. Paris, Champs Elysees. Register here!

Trust in the content you analyze, Trust in your analytics.

We will demo TrustedOut Corpus Intelligence to provide tailor-made content, precisely defined by the analyst and how it impacts analytics to make secure, solid and trustworthy decisions.

Discover why we say “TrustedOut Corpus Intelligence makes Intelligence smarter and trustworthy.”

Register asap to secure a seat!

Time for journalists to acknowledge that they write from a set of values, not simply from a disinterested effort at truth?

As Columbia Journalism Review puts it, “one gets the sense that the pitch of anti-press sentiment is now the most fevered it’s been since the founding of the republic. In fact, presidents from George Washington on, including Thomas Jefferson… judged newspapers to be full of lies. “. Sounds familiar?

Credits: cjr.org

Readers responsibility to discern for themselves the difference between what can be trusted as factual and reporter’s judgment. 

“… the old days of ritually objective news reporting (he said/she said) are not gone but have been reduced in importance from the 1970s on, as mainstream outlets have increasingly emphasized analysis in news coverage—not quite so much “who, what, when, where” as “why.” There has been a profound cultural shift in journalism during this period. The limitations of straitjacketed objectivity came to be understood and journalism began to embrace the necessity of interpretation… In the face of the severe economic problems afflicting daily newspapers, leading metro dailies have continued, whenever possible, to pursue aggressive, analytical journalism. This places great responsibility on readers to discern for themselves the difference between what can be trusted as factual and what represents the reporter’s judgment—a judgment that, however conscientious, goes beyond documented facts.”

“It may also be time for journalists to acknowledge that they write from a set of values, not simply from a disinterested effort at truth.”

“This will not be easy, since journalists have spent decades denying that their personal values have anything to do with their news reporting.”

Trust is personal. Personal is Trust.

“Tom Rosenstiel, the executive director of the American Press Institute, told her that for many people, “there’s ‘the media’ (bad) and there’s ‘my media’ (fairly good).” Likewise, he noted, people have little faith in Congress but think their own local representatives are okay.

Sounds familiar? Yep. We wrote about this…

developed in this post: While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

Bottom line: Media should strengthen their brand values with the upmost  transparency to increase Reader’s trust.

Questions? Shoot!

TrustedOut AI-Operated Classification

Data Collection and Content Classification.

Our database of Media profiles has 2 distinct jobs. Collecting intangible data, like revenue, ownership, years online…) and Classifying content for our taxonomy and how sites are “spotted as” (like “fake news”, “junk science”…)

Data Collection is a multi-references, cross checking and evolution watch crawling exercise when…

Content Classification is all about Machine Learning.

And all about “bags of words”. For every classification job, we build datasets made of words onto which the frequency of occurence is used to train a classifier.

As mentioned above, we have 2 types of Classification: Taxonomy and “spotted as”.

Taxonomy Classification.

As in the graphic above, every articles is matched against our taxonomy datasets so we can classify each and every article. This gives us a clear picture of a feed, and thus, the whole media.

This, of course, makes a (big) lot of operations: 75,000 per article. Yes, 75 Billions ops per million of articles daily.

Taxonomy fun facts (as of today!)

Taxonomy DNA

Hereafter is the visualization of the New York Times, Tech section’s DNA.

Sensitiveness and depth customization. Tailor-made for the analyst.

Datasets used to classify articles can use a customized buffer of time for those datasets and thus, manage how sensitive to daily news the taxonomy will be. In addition, cliffs can also be customized to select a depth of expertise, from “dedicated” to “covered” or even “all sounds”. Both combined, plus the “always up-to-date” factor, makes our taxonomy perfectly tailor-made for the job the analyst wants to run. Reason why we use “Corpus Intelligence” as our tagline.

Enterprise mapping.

We can also link our taxonomy to our Enterprise Client’s taxonomy, so Corpus Intelligence can use the client’s business environment, (We’ll cover this in a dedicated post later. If you can’t wait, ask using the form below)

“Spotted as” Classification.

Point of being AI-Operated is we do not have any emotion or opinion. Everything is made for our client to define what they truly need and trust for content.

TrustedOut does not score nor judge anything or anyone. In addition, notions like “fake news” is not as cristal clear as people may think. The “Media, Trust and Democracy report” says it perfectly in its introduction: “Concern about “fake news” is high, but we can’t agree on what that means.”

A vivid picture on how a Media is “spotted as”.

As, TrustedOut profiles Media and their brand values, we have developed a sophisticated way to classify how a Media is “spotted”. In other words, we do not score or judge, we tell you if a Media is “spotted as” a fake news publication, for example.

In addition, the way a Media is “spotted as” varies over time. Some are getting worse, some are just revivals of previously shutdown ones, some are, of course, fixed and improved. This is why it’s mandatory to keep an always updated classification. And consequently, have your Corpus of documents always up-to-date.

Works with any terms. Bad or good.

“Fake news” is always the first coming to mind, then all toxic or suspicious terms like “Extreme bias”, “Junk Science”… but it can also works perfectly for neutral or positive terms, like “Visionary”, “Optimistic”… This opens doors to Enterprise-wide personalization.

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In California, “Cannabis industry more trusted than Social Media”.

Our takeaways from this recommended Wired article:

“58 percent of Californians think the tech industry should be “more regulated,” up from 46 percent in 2018. An even larger group, 68 percent think the tech industry has been “under-regulated” rather than “over-regulated,” up from 62 percent in 2018 and about 59 percent in 2017.”

Level of trust in marijuana dispensaries and growers—44% and 43%. Trust in social media—33%.

Credits: Edelman

Failure to protect data and lack of privacy.

“Among employees, privacy and security were the top worries. Of 11 possible concerns about the tech industry—from increasing housing costs and income inequality to a possible tech bubble collapse—57 percent of workers said their primary concern was “failure to protect from data security threats,” tied with “lack of privacy/my data is shared too much.””

Gonna be ok.

“For “tech” as a whole, 61 percent of respondents said they had a high level of trust that the industry would do what’s right. For “startup companies” and “the sharing economy,” the figures were similar to the pot industry—47 percent of respondents said they trusted companies in those sectors to do the right thing.”

High expectations for an outsize impact.

“Sixty-seven percent of respondents said tech leaders should be doing more to improve California. Given the industry’s outsize impact, 81 percent said tech should do more to improve local issues, up from 75 percent in 2018 and 76 percent said tech leaders are obligated to do more on societal issues, up from 71 percent last year.”

Get information from traditional Media, Conversation on Social Media…

As we wrote:

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Questions? Shoot!